I need to know about P2P file sharing

Today’s resource provided by the Australian Communication and Media Authority‘s Cybersmart website is information on person to person file sharing. The page looks at:

  • is it legal?
  • know the basics
  • how to protect yourself

 

http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/Teens/I%20need%20to%20know%20about/P2P%20file%20sharing.aspx

Public servants who bag employers on social media to suffer severe “consequences”, says government technical office

Back in September, the Canberra Times published an article on the consequences of government employees who criticise their employers on social media.

“If you spend time bagging your organisation online or offline, you should not think that your employment is going to continue unconditionally,” he told the audience.

“You shouldn’t be surprised by the consequences.”

“If you post defamatory material on a pinboard in the office, this behaviour should be treated in the same way as posting that material online.

This article is relevant to all of us who have a job, as it reminds us, whether we are employed part-time at McDonalds or as the CEO of a large corporation, that our posts are going to be read and judged by others, whether we like it or not.

Read the whole article here.

Digital citizens in Minecraft

 5th Graders designed a Digital Citizenship & Cyber Safety Game in Minecraft during an after school technology club. The game was entirely built by the students and this was their first try at gamification for an educational project based learning experience in the school library.

A worthwhile video for any student who loves using Minecraft.

Facebook hands teenagers a megaphone

Recently ReadWrite published a post explaining that Facebook now

…officially wants teens to overshare as well, in ways that might also make them better fodder for advertising.

Facebook announced today that teenage users can now make their posts public on Facebook. Previously, the social network limited users between the ages of 13 and 17 to distributing posts to their extended network—i.e. friends and friends of friends. Teenage users also now have the option to turn on the “follow” setting for their accounts, letting public updates appear in news feeds.

Read the whole post here.

Teenagers’ anti-sexting app launched

Recently the BBC reported that a new app, Zipit, has been launched to help teenagers politely and wittily deflect requests for intimate pictures.

The free app from (UK charity) Childline offers users a choice of what the charity says are “witty responses” to send instead

Although Zipit is a free app, sending responses Zipit provides may incur mobile carrier costs. Zipit is available through iTunes and Google Play.

A social profile is not a CV

Recently The Age published an article stating that a social media profile is not a CV. Year 11 student Olympia Nelson states:

Young people need to be protected from cyber-spying by prospective employers.

It’s creepy to think that you’re being stalked. But how much creepier is it that a group of people sit around a long table analysing information on your Facebook profile in order to decide whether you’re worthy of a job in their organisation?

The government is not going to protect you from people looking at what you publish. It’s up to you to portray yourself as you’d like to be seen. She continues:

When teachers say: ‘‘Do you know that employers will actually search you on Facebook’’, they are implicitly condoning, rather than condemning, this despicable and illogical intrusiveness. Why aren’t they devoting their energies to berating search companies for cyber-stalking?

Like it or not, what you put out to the public domain via social media is going to be viewed and used by others. Whether it’s a prospective employer or worse, what you publicly publish is open to all. We aren’t condoning it, we’re just telling it like it is. A reminder to think before you post.

Children caught in online blackmail

A concerning story from the United Kingdom a few weeks ago involving children being blackmailed. The Independent reports:

The blackmailing of children has emerged as a fast-growing new method employed by sadistic abusers who operate behind fake profiles on social networks to take advantage of youthful sexual experimentation and snare their victims, driving some to self-harm and even suicide.

…grooming often starts on open chat forums before moving to private areas where the talk swiftly becomes more explicit. The threats usually start after children have been tricked into posting compromising pictures of themselves that they fear could be distributed more widely.

Although this story concerns the United Kingdom, it’s a timely reminder for us all to ensure we know who it is we’re communicating with online and not to share intimate photos and/or videos online.

A Letter To Parents Of Digital Age Children

This letter to parents of digital age children has three specific pieces of advice:

1. Teach your children how to cross the digital street

2. Help your children pursue their passions online

3. Help your children manage their digital “brand”

It continues

We need parents to act as important models and supports in their childrens’ explorations online. We need, parents and schools alike, to get past the fear that holds us back from connecting with young people when they need us most. Only then can we help them travel far and learn from the journey once they cross the street to encounter the world.

Read more here.

Who’s chatting to your kids?

Queensland Police has developed a resource for parents entitled Who’s chatting to your kids: surviving social media use with your children. Covering the topics of:

  • social media
  • smart devices and phones
  • other internet capable devices (gaming consoles, smart televisions)
  • sexting
  • signs your child could be at risk
  • suggestions to help protect your child on the internet
  • family safety internet agreement

The most important piece of advice they give is:

Maintain direct and open communication with your child.

This is a useful resource, however, I’d like to see more emphasis on children and young adults being encouraged to build a positive digital footprint.