‘Eraser’ law will let Californian kids scrub online past

California Governor Jerry Brown has spoken to Phys.org about the US state passing a law that entitles young adults to delete their online past.

“Kids so often self-reveal before they self-reflect,” James Steyer, founder of Common Sense Media, a  in San Francisco that pushed for the law, told the San Francisco Chronicle.

“Mistakes can stay with teens for life, and their digital footprint can follow them wherever they go.”

But now

social media titans such as Facebook, Twitter and Google [will] let minors scrub their personal online history in the hopes that it might help them avoid personal and work-related problems.

Do you agree with the passing of this law? Do you think it will help young adults or prevent them from learning about the realities of social media?

Read the whole article here.

I need to know about P2P file sharing

Today’s resource provided by the Australian Communication and Media Authority‘s Cybersmart website is information on person to person file sharing. The page looks at:

  • is it legal?
  • know the basics
  • how to protect yourself

 

http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/Teens/I%20need%20to%20know%20about/P2P%20file%20sharing.aspx

Public servants who bag employers on social media to suffer severe “consequences”, says government technical office

Back in September, the Canberra Times published an article on the consequences of government employees who criticise their employers on social media.

“If you spend time bagging your organisation online or offline, you should not think that your employment is going to continue unconditionally,” he told the audience.

“You shouldn’t be surprised by the consequences.”

“If you post defamatory material on a pinboard in the office, this behaviour should be treated in the same way as posting that material online.

This article is relevant to all of us who have a job, as it reminds us, whether we are employed part-time at McDonalds or as the CEO of a large corporation, that our posts are going to be read and judged by others, whether we like it or not.

Read the whole article here.

I need to know about social networking and online friends

Continuing on with the resources provided by the Australian Communication and Media Authority‘s Cybersmart website, the information social networking and online friends is very useful. It includes information on:

  • Are they my friends in real life too?
  • Know the basics of safe social networking
  • Meeting online friends in the real world – do you really know who you’re meeting?
Well worth checking out. Read the whole post here.

http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/Teens/I%20need%20to%20know%20about/Social%20networking%20and%20online%20friends.aspx

Digital citizens in Minecraft

 5th Graders designed a Digital Citizenship & Cyber Safety Game in Minecraft during an after school technology club. The game was entirely built by the students and this was their first try at gamification for an educational project based learning experience in the school library.

A worthwhile video for any student who loves using Minecraft.

I need to know about online gaming

Another resource provided by the Australian Communication and Media Authority‘s Cybersmart website is about online gaming. Covering both video games and gambling, this resource includes information on

  • knowing the basics and
  • protecting yourself

Read the whole post here.

Facebook hands teenagers a megaphone

Recently ReadWrite published a post explaining that Facebook now

…officially wants teens to overshare as well, in ways that might also make them better fodder for advertising.

Facebook announced today that teenage users can now make their posts public on Facebook. Previously, the social network limited users between the ages of 13 and 17 to distributing posts to their extended network—i.e. friends and friends of friends. Teenage users also now have the option to turn on the “follow” setting for their accounts, letting public updates appear in news feeds.

Read the whole post here.

Teenagers’ anti-sexting app launched

Recently the BBC reported that a new app, Zipit, has been launched to help teenagers politely and wittily deflect requests for intimate pictures.

The free app from (UK charity) Childline offers users a choice of what the charity says are “witty responses” to send instead

Although Zipit is a free app, sending responses Zipit provides may incur mobile carrier costs. Zipit is available through iTunes and Google Play.