Anonymous vs appropriate

George Couros, a Canadian Division Principal, has written a blog post responding to some of the statistics revealed by the 2013 Pew Report.

The statistics he reports are:

  • 91% post a photo of themselves, up from 79% in 2006.
  • 71% post their school name, up from 49%.
  • 71% post the city or town where they live, up from 61%.
  • 53% post their email address, up from 29%.
  • 20% post their cell phone number, up from 2%.

In addition to the trend questions, we also asked five new questions about the profile teens use most often and found that among teen social media users:

  • 92% post their real name to the profile they use most often.2
  • 84% post their interests, such as movies, music, or books they like.
  • 82% post their birth date.
  • 62% post their relationship status.
  • 24% post videos of themselves.

What Couros questions is the push from some schools and parents for students to remain anonymous on the net. As this is obviously not happening, Couros suggests that perhaps we should be teaching our young adults (and children) to post appropriately. A good digital footprint will soon replace a curriculum vitae (if that’s not already the case).

Public vs private

Recently world renowned educator George Couros wrote a blog post about personal and professional use of social media as well as the concept of public vs privacy online.

And although written for an audience of educators, there are several points that students (and adults) can take from this post.

It is not that we can’t be ourselves online, but we should just be more cognizant of what we do there. Many of us, including myself, talk differently when we are around our closest friends and family.  I know that what you post online can take opportunities away from you, it could also provide opportunities as well.  I use the example often in workshops of two people applying for a job as a mechanic and one person writes on a resume that they can do an oil change, while another candidate posts a video on YouTube of them doing an oil change. Who would you hire?  In most cases, the one that has put their learning public and you know they can do the job (it still has to be good work), are at an advantage.  There are definitely some things that you want public.

Read the whole post here.