I’m 13 and none of my friends are on Facebook

Last week, Mashable published this post on the waning appeal of Facebook by a New York teenager.

Now, when we are old enough to get Facebook, we don’t want it. By the time we could have Facebooks, we were already obsessed with Instagram. Facebook was just this thing all our parents seemed to have.

Let’s say I get invited to a party, and there’s underage drinking. I’m not drinking, but someone pulls out a camera. Even if I’m not carrying a red Solo cup, I could be photographed behind a girl doing shots. Later that week, the dumb-dumb decides to post photos from that “amazing” party. If my mom saw I was at a party with drinking, even if I wasn’t participating, I’d be dead. This isn’t Facebook’s fault, but it happens there.

Facebook is also a big source of bullying in middle school. Kids might comment something mean on a photo of you, or message you mean things. This isn’t Facebook’s fault, but again, it does happen there. If my mom heard I was getting bullied on Facebook, she would tell me to quit right away.

An interesting insight into teenagers’ thoughts about social media. Read the whole post here.

How teenagers actually use the internet

Buzzfeed has a very brief post and a graphic about how teenagers are using social media.

They have also published a teenager’s view on the hot (and not so hot) social media sites as well as linking to survey results on the same topic.

In a nutshell, Facebook’s appeal seems to be waning for teenagers at least, while Instagram are Snapchat are hot.

Snapchat and sexting

Snapchat is an app for iOS and Android that lets the user send a photo that can self destruct after a set period of time. Snapchat explains:

You control how long you want your friends to view your messages. We’ll let you know if we detect that they’ve taken a screenshot!

Recently I read in The Age that Cosmo magazine says Snapchat is the safe way to sext as the photos can’t be kept. However, as the snapchat FAQs explains, anyone can take a screenshot or screencast of your pic before it disappears. The only difference is you can control who sees your original upload and you can be alerted as to who has saved your picture.

However, once someone has saved your pic, there’s no way of controlling where and when it is reposted. Also as snapchat explains, without enacted privacy controls,

By default, anyone who knows your username or phone number can send you a message.

Read Mashable’s take on snapchat here and Common Sense Media’s view of snapchat here.

The lowdown is that anything sent digitally has the ability to be redistributed at a later stage. The ‘think before you send’ mantra still applies.