Twitter changes its rules to help protect users

Twitter has just updated its rules to help protect users from abuse and spam.

Abusive behaviour has been targeted with a new “I’m reporting an abusive user” page:

This makes it so much easier to report abuse than previously. Hopefully, this will also discourage abusers.

1 in 4 young adults regret social media posts

Mashable reports that

Among younger adults aged 18 to 34, 29% said they have posted a photo, comment or other personal information they fear could compromise their current or future job prospects.

FindLaw, the organisation that carried out the survey on 1000 American adults suggests that

social-media users: Think before you post, check your privacy settings, limit your personal information and seek legal help if you think you’re ever wrongfully terminated. The survey did find that a sizeable 82% of young users “pay at least some attention to their privacy settings,” while only 6% leave the default settings as they are.

 

Read the whole report here.

How to stay private on Facebook (yes, again…)

Last week, The Age reported that controlling your privacy on Facebook is about to become a whole lot easier.

If you’ve never played with your Facebook privacy settings, the first thing you’ll want to do is safeguard your future. On Facebook.com, click the little padlock on the top right, then under “Who can see my stuff” make sure “Friends” is selected – unless you want all your content to be public by default. As a further precaution, if you have a particular Facebook friend who you want to hide stuff from – a relative or a boss perhaps – add them to a “restricted list”. This will keep them as a friend but hide anything not set to “Public” from them, without their knowledge. To restrict a friend, go to their profile, hover your mouse over the “Friends” box, select “Add to another list” and then select “Restricted”.

The article also explains how to untag yourself in photos and how to see what your profile looks like to other users. Read the whole article here.

Generation gap causing issues with cyberbullying

A recent article in The Australian newspaper has stated that parents who don’t match their children’s online skills are ill-equipped to deal with all aspects of cybersafety.

THE generation gap has left courts ill-equipped to deal with cyber bullying, a senior judge says.

And a top cop says parents must match their children’s cyber skills to stay a step ahead of online predators.

Australian Federal Police Deputy Commissioner (operations) Michael Phelan, who will also speak at the two-day conference beginning on Thursday, urged parents to match their children’s abilities online to ward off trolls and stalkers on social media.

“The digital divide between what children know and what their parents know can mean that we may be one step behind children and, subsequently, one step behind the offenders,” he said.

Read the whole article here.

A student’s take on selfies

Last week The Age and Sydney Morning Herald published an article by a year 11 student Olympia Nelson on the practice of teenage girls uploading sexy self portraits to social media. She explains:

If social media only caused narcissism, it wouldn’t be the worst thing. Instagram and Facebook are social networks that not only breed narcissistic tendencies but transform relations into a sexual rat race.

On these ubiquitous portals, the popularity of girls is hotly contested over one big deal: how sexy can I appear and bring it off with everyone’s admiration?

A common adult reaction to social media is to restrict things, as if that could ever be possible. You can’t force kids to be nice. The real problem isn’t something tangible like sexting or bullying, which adults focus on in patronising and unimaginative ways. The real problem relates to conformity. Kids are compelled to act the stereotype, because those who opt out commit themselves to social leprosy. Social media doesn’t need adult control. What we need is some good taste.

Read the whole article here.

How Gen Y feels about online privacy

Earlier this year, a group of gen y panelists shared their thoughts about online privacy. The six panelists explained how they now modify their online behaviour as

“We live in public.”

Darius was keenly aware that everything he shares on Twitter or other social media platforms is “out there,” which has made him extremely conscious about what he posts. “I would expect people to be more conscious,” he said.

“I have to filter myself,” Jordan said, explaining that she was concerned that some photos or check-ins she was tagged in on Facebook would send the wrong message to employers and colleagues.

Tess was shocked to find out that she curses more than 90 percent of other people on the social network, and the information has changed her behavior.

It’s great to see young adults in charge of their social media accounts, taking into account the fact that they will be judged by what they post.

Read the whole post here.

Teenagers, social media and privacy

The recently released 2013 Pew Report section on teenagers, social media and privacy has unearthed some interesting details:

  • 24% of  online teenagers now use Twitter
  • 80% use some kind of social media
  • 77% of online teens use Facebook
  • Some teenagers don’t see Twitter as social media
  • 75% of social media users check their accounts daily

Read the whole report here.